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News from Hinche and Papaye

March 5, 2010

Today’s report is two-fold. I first received the following e-mail (excerpts pasted below) from Mark Coughlin of Atlanta who is doing amazing work with tents, water purification and other highly needed relief efforts.

Monday – I rose early and hit the road, this time to visit our old friend and former Sacre Coeur vicar, Fr. Fitho Jean, who has moved up in the world and is now director of the Propedeutique seminary there, which is where the year of preparatory study and discernment before Grand Seminary takes place. It also gave me a chance to check in with our sponsored seminarians who live there. Fr. Fitho told me about how his little brother died in the earthquake.

Pere Fitho, who lost a brother in the quake


After breakfast, Fr. B. and I went up to Papay, where the surviving Port au Prince seminarians have been relocated. I spent some time taking photos and talking with several of them who are in our program. We had some good laughs, but it became very somber when we talked about the earthquake, the destruction of the seminary in PaP, how they managed to survive and about all the dear friends they were not able to save. After that, we went a little further up the road to check on one more refugee camp and again found that our Klorfasil Safe Water gals, Jocelyne and Irenee and my Better Health for Haiti guys had done a terrific job and every single family there was sanitizing their water with one of our systems. In the afternoon, I met up with Dr. Dagerus and the rest of our clinic staff. Monday is the day Dr. Dagerus sees malnutrition patients, and lots of them.

The collapsed seminary in PAP


I also just got off the phone with Pere Romel who runs the Emmaus Center in Papaye. He is housing fifty displaced seminarians and describes post-quake life in the Central Plateau as a daily struggle (the same described in Mark’s post above.) Many of these seminarians lost friends and loved ones in the quake. Please keep them in your prayers.

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